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Newsmakers: July 14, 2013

Updated: Friday, July 26 2013, 01:45 PM EDT
Part One
In January 2010, demonstrators in Tahrir Square in Cairo believed they toppled decades of dictatorial rule and ushered in a new era of democracy and civil society. 
Two years later, Egyptians again found themselves squared off across Tahrir Square, divided over the meaning and legitimacy of the democratically elected president, Mohammed Morsi. 
Now that the military has once again asserted itself, where does that leave Egypt? And where does that leave the United States in the view of Egyptians? 
At the end of the 18th century, colonists living in the 13 English Colonies led the First Revolution of the Modern Era.  But in the 21st century, as a super power that prefers stability and predictability, the turmoil unleashed by the Arab spring puts the United States in a difficult position between established governments and popular sentiment. 
I do not normally venture into international affairs, but this week I became aware that a long time local leader now lives in Cairo and is home on a visit. 
I am joined this morning by Anthony Perzigian, who worked at the University of Cincinnati for 40 years, as a professor of anthropology and as an administrator. For the last 14 years, he served as senior vice president for academic affairs and the provost at the university. 
After retiring from UC, Dr. Perzigian transitioned in January 2011 to a role as the board of trustees chair adviser of the future University of Egypt for quality assurance  and academic affairs.  That responsibility has allowed him to observe close up the revolutionary change sweeping Egypt. 
Part Two
Cincinnati has been an outstanding center for the arts since the 1870s.  In the 21st century, we are rapidly coming to the understanding that innovation and entrepreneurial activity are what will give us a future. 
Artworks empowers and inspires the creative community to transform our everyday environments through employment, apprenticeships, education, community partnerships, and civic engagement.The most visible expression of artworks are the great murals around the city. 
A new program, Springboard, is a business planning and development program for artists, artisans and creative entrepreneurs, that targets sustainability in small business. 
Frances Kroner, the chef/owner of feast and a graduate of Springboard, is working with a group of student apprentices this summer and Teresa Hoelle, the Vice President of Development and External Affairs for Artworks. Newsmakers: July 14, 2013


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