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Culinary school teaches students how to reduce food waste

A local college is teaching future chefs to rescue food that's usually wasted, and this "edible garbage" is helping the Tri-State's needy. (WKRC)

CLIFTON, Ohio (WKRC) - A local college is teaching future chefs to rescue food that's usually wasted, and this "edible garbage" is helping the Tri-State's needy.

Paul D'Agostino and Marisa Martinez attend the Midwest Culinary Institute. In class Wednesday, both made soup that not only tastes good, it's good for you.

And where this food comes from is actually anything but typical. It's soup made from somebody else's garbage.

Perfectly edible vegetables, if not used by a restaurant or grocery store would get tossed out, but instead here it becomes two tons a year of produced, edible, wholesome food.

The food that goes into these soups comes from a variety of sources--all with one goal in mind. That purpose Wednesday was to make a product that gets served to the homeless.

Other days, however, it's about letting students know that leftovers are lethal to our planet. Forty percent of food produced in the United States is wasted, taking up 21 percent of landfill space.

And that space is expensive waste for those who manage a food budget at work or at home. The average family of four wastes $1,500 a year in wasted food.

So in addition to a perfect product, this team says the real lesson learned is how to serve up a serious solution by making an difference in poverty and hunger.


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