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New guidelines encourage smarter testing when it comes to orthopedic problems

A new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics says parents should choose wisely when it comes to testing for orthopedic problems, such as broken bones. (WKRC)

CINCINNATI (WKRC) - A new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics says parents should choose wisely when it comes to testing for orthopedic problems, such as broken bones. The team at Orthocincy shared a few important things parents should know about them.

Just a few weeks ago, Abigail was rollerskating and got hurt. She got in to see Dr. Matt Desjardins, who specializes in sports injuries.

His prescription calls for frog hops-- clearly not a lot of invasive testing and treatment. But it's exactly what these new guidelines called "Choosing Wisely" recommends because they are geared at testing less.

The first of these guidelines is hip dysplasia testing, to see if patient's hips are in the sockets.

The guidelines do recommend imaging for certain problems, but for this one, it's done in babies. If it appears there's no other risks when it comes to hip dysplasia, since it is so a rare, the advanced imaging techniques or ultrasounds are probably not indicated in most situations.

Another one of the guidelines says surgery or bracing isn't necessary for what's called "mild in-toeing gait." That's when a child, instead of walking straight up, will walk with their toes turned in a little bit, or even walk a little bit bowlegged.

The guidelines suggest monitoring children initially for proper treatment.

For bone breaks, there are newer guidelines, too. They suggest follow-up X-rays may not be needed once the injury is no longer tender or painful.

And finally, if a child has flat feet, the new guidelines say if doctors think it's part of the developmental cycle, they may not require treatment initially.

Click here to see the whole guidelines.

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