Most Shared

TroubleShooter

TroubleShooter

 
text size

Howard Ain, Troubleshooter: Too Much Trust

Updated: Wednesday, November 27 2013, 04:29 PM EST
CINCINNATI (Howard Ain) -- Certain scams have been around for a long time, but the thieves keep changing them enough so they snare new victims.

Local 12 Troubleshooter Howard Ain has a warning for those who use Craigslist.

It seemed like the perfect job, but an ad on Craigslist led one unsuspecting college student into the hands of a con artist.

Here's a scam of which we all need to be aware.

"She needed a little extra spending money," says U.S Postal Inspector Eric Wise.  

Wanted: cleaning, cooking, and residential house cleaner. Up to 12 dollars an hour.

Craiglist lists jobs seem perfect for anyone looking for quick cash, but one college freshman now knows better.

"If a guy is looking for someone to clean a house he is going to move into and he's going to pay roughly $50.00 bucks a cleaning and eventually could lead to other cleaning gigs," says Wise.

Postal inspectors say she found a perfect job that would not interfere with her classes.

"The suspect sends her back am email shortly after detailing the job and asking her for more specific information. Kind of makes her feel it legitimizes the job a bit," says Wise.

Then, the victim is asked to do a "favor" for her new employer.

"I've got an artist I've commissioned to do a painting for my house and what I'd like to do is instead of writing two checks, I'd like to write you a check, have you take your fees out and the cleaning supplies fees out and then have you send the rest of the checkout to my artists," says Wise.

She admits she didn't hesitate, thinking the request was no big deal.

That night actually she went to get some fast food, swiped her debit card, it was declined. I think the meal was just a few bucks. She said this doesn't make any sense at all I just made $300," says Wise.

She did exactly as she was asked and found out there was a problem almost immediately.

"She goes to the bank the next day, they say yeah, the check you deposited was a fraudulent check, it came back."

She goes to the ATM and her account is $2,700.00 in the red.

Obviously gets no contact and that's when she realizes she had been scammed," says Wise.

She tried to talk to her bank, but got no help. In fact, the $2700.00 was sent to a collections agency and wreaked havoc on her credit.

"The life lesson she learned the hard way is never trust an ad on Craigslist. Do your due diligence. The same amount of resources you would put into how you got ripped off and if you can get credit you need to do so beforehand," says Wise.

U.S. postal inspectors say if you're at all suspicious about the validity of a check, take it to your bank and ask them to investigate before you deposit the check. Howard Ain, Troubleshooter: Too Much Trust


Advertise with us!

Related Stories

Scam Alert

  • E-greeting Card Scam

    The e-greeting card scam is not a new one, but the FBI says it's returned with a vengeance.

    It's Internet Crime Complaint Center is receiving an increasing number of complaints.

    The fraud e-cards contain malware as an attachment, or it contains a link which sends the recipient to a web page where they can pick up viruses, keystroke loggers or other so-called trojan horse programs.

    The e-cards sometimes even appear to be from legitimate e-card greeting web sites-- but the actual address of the links point to a numeric address, rather than one containing the name of the postcard company.

    If you get one of these e-mails you can file a complaint on the FBI's web site, http://www.ic3.gov/.
  • Jury Duty Scam

    Officials all across the Tri-State are warning about a jury duty scam that may put you at risk for identity theft.

    Police say someone has been calling residents and saying they face arrest for failing to report for jury duty.

    The caller asks people for personal information including their Social Security numbers to clear up the situation.

    Authorities say the calls are part of a nationwide scam. If you think you have been a victim call your local police or sheriff's department.
 

More TroubleShooter Links

TroubleShooter Feedback

Do you have a problem that needs Howard's attention? Fill out the form below and let him know!
Please re-enter the code shown in the image below.
Advertise with us!