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Ask The Experts: The Nordic Diet

CINCINNATI (Liz Bonis) -- It's one of the hottest diets to shape up for summer, but does it really work to improve your health and help you drop pounds?
 
Medical reporter Liz Bonis Asks the Experts at TriHealth about  the new Nordic Diet.  It's hard not to get caught up in the beauty of the countryside when you look at YouTube videos of areas such as Norway, Sweden and Denmark.  But the diet they eat there, that's really what many people are getting caught up in right now.
 
Registered Dietitian Dianne Schneider says there may be a good reason for that!  The new "Nordic Diet," as it's known, is actually the way all of us should eat for good health.  It's higher in seafood and poultry rather than red meat and olive oil and good fats rather than butter.  It is based on plant foods and especially root vegetables such as carrots and beets.

Schneider said, "All that rich color translates into vitamins and minerals."

Part of the reason this diet is getting so much attention has to do with the health benefits.  A recent study in the Journal of Internal Medicine found people who ate this way for 6 to 18 weeks were able to lower cholesterol levels, drop blood pressure levels, and even improve what's called "insulin sensitivity" which can help blood sugars.  But in addition to that, several other studies found that even though people were asked not to cut calories on the diet they were able to eat less, lose weight, and that has to do with what's called the "satiety of the diet."  This is when you feel not just full, but satisfied after you eat.

Schneider says much of that satiety comes in a plate with mainly fiber and almost strictly whole grains.  Instead of just white and brown rice, eat different types of grains like cous cous and quinoa.  She says berries are popular on the diet but the downside is it's not the usual kinds of berries that are easy to find such as strawberries.  Schneider says in order to succeed you'll need to swap to adapt.

"My philosophy, when I talk to my patients is keep it simple, because if you can keep it simple, keep the foods you enjoy, that follow the same characteristics of the Nordic Diet, you are going to do a lot better," she said.
 
That's because part of this diet also calls for things you'd only find in certain parts of the world known as "wild foods."  They range from  cloudberry jam to moss to ants.  And in case your wondering, the  recommended dessert is barley pudding.

If you'd like to find a complete list of foods on the new Nordic Diet CLICK HERE.

Click HERE to watch

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