Study: Relationships differently impact men, women's physical health


    A recent survey found improving health is the top New Year's resolution in 2019, but a new report says a few changes in your life might influence whether or not you can keep that resolution. (WKRC File)

    CINCINNATI (WKRC) - A recent survey found improving health is the top New Year's resolution in 2019, but a new report says a few changes in your life might influence whether or not you can keep that resolution.

    The top three New Year's resolutions, according to inc.com, are to eat healthier, lose weight and exercise more. But a new exercise study found if you've had a few changes in your life to your marital status or finances, it might influence how much you move and your long-term health.

    A study on physical activity in the Scandinavian Journal of Public Health revealed that men who recently got divorced had fewer non-exercise steps in the next four years. Women who remarried had significantly fewer steps. These were both compared to people in stable relationships.

    Researchers also found those with more money move more than those who do not. Researchers say a change in your marital status or finances may influence activity.

    Dr. Howard Schertzinger of OrthoCincy says when you stop moving, it impacts a lot -- not just your heart and brain, but the bones and the spine too due to bone loss or osteoporosis.

    Dr. Schertzinger says that, in older adults, especially older women, more women die of hip fractures than breast cancer, often due to complications.

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