10 Years later, local damage still visible from Hurricane Ike

10 Years later: Damage still visible from wind storm from Hurricane Ike (WKRC)

CINCINNATI (WKRC)- On Sept. 14, 2008, a wind storm ripped through the Tri-State that caused more than a billion dollars in damage across Ohio. It was a remnant of Hurricane Ike. Seven people were killed because of it. More than two million people were without power.

Spring Grove Cemetery was one of the hardest hit areas. The winds forced 150 trees to be removed because of snapped limbs or they were just uprooted. Eventually more than 500 trees would have to be removed because of damage from the wind.

Ron Rothhaas, Jr. is a certified master arborist and the Managing Director of the Arbor Doctor. He remembers being at a church dinner when the wind began to pick up a decade ago.

"I remember seeing a silver maple tree in the church yard fall over while we were eating and the wind was really howling outside," Rothhaas said. "We saw shingles flying off the roof of the building and the siding try to come off a barn across the street."

There were wind advisories issued for the area but no one was ready for what happened.

"The power lines were out. The traffic lights were out and police were directing traffic at some intersections and we didn't have power at our house and I don't think we got it back for about three days," Rothhaas said.

Some people they waited even longer for the lights to come back on.

Thousands of trees were destroyed by the storm.

"I kind of compare Ike to going to the nursery and buying a tree and putting it in the back of your pickup truck and driving from here to Cleveland at 70 m.p.h." Rothhaas said.

Over the years many more would come down because of damage from the wind.

"You might get a crack. You might get a weakening in the bark. You might get a weakening in the trunk that may break a long time after that."

Rothhaas said every now and then they will still come across a tree that shows signs of damage from the storm a decade ago but it’s getting more difficult to determine if the damage was caused by the wind storm or a subsequent storm in recent years.

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